April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)
April Dawn Alison <br>Erin O’Toole (ed.)

April Dawn Alison
Erin O’Toole (ed.)

MACK, 2019
First edition
Hardcover, 220 pages, 245 x 275 mm
Condition: New


For her whole life, April Dawn Alison had harbored a secret: she’d been living a double life. During the day, she was called Alan, an ex-military commercial photographer. It wasn’t until 2008, when she died alone aged 67 that the identity of her true inner self emerged, leaving behind 9,200 Polaroid self-portraits she took over four decades; an obsessive practice inspired by representations of women in classic films, BDSM pornography and advertising.
Following her death, these images were sold by the manager of her estate (April Dawn was, allegedly, estranged from her family), and were eventually acquired by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2017. Until recently, few people had seen this body of work. Those who had didn’t know if Alison would have wanted the world to see it; they didn’t know much of anything about her at all.

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